Ward

I awoke to the nurse poking

Prodding

She noticed I was at least somewhat awake

On a scale of 1 to 10

She said

How’s the pain

I felt like saying I don’t do numbers

I’m not a fucking accountant

It just hurts

Settled on 9

Which she wrote down on her chart

Oh, a chart

I recognized that

She loomed into view

You’ve had a shock

No fucking kidding dear

The meds will help

Here’s the call button

As it faded into translucent grey

 

 

David Trudel  ©  2012

 

 

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4 Comments

Filed under Poetry

4 responses to “Ward

  1. Reblogged this on shafiqah1 and commented:
    Amen! I sympathize, if I have to take my Dad to one more hospital where he goes through what you describe! OMG! I Hope your pain subsides and you are healed by heaven, I have no faith in medicine right now!

    • I strained my knee and suffered some relatively minor pain yesterday which got me thinking about the time I smashed my left leg and right foot and learned the depth of real pain. That’s in the past but we are all just a heartbeat away from agony. Hope your Dad is having a better day.

      • My Dad is a Diabetic, with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Neuropathy. Kind of a bad one today, but tomorrow he may feel pretty good. Ups and downs with serious pain and illness… But you, whoa, Shattering a leg!!! OMG! Did you have pins in it? Yikes! Thanks for the well wishes 😀

  2. Tib/fib with hardware, as the nurses said. I still have two plates and 21 pins in my left leg, plus a pin in my big toe on the right. Stay off of ladders! I was putting up a swing in a big old maple tree when a branch broke, and the big metal extension ladder slipped and I ended up having one of those slow motion “oh shit!” moments. But I almost immediately went into acceptance of it all and actually tried to fully experience the pain, since I thought it would be good writing material, and unlikely that I’d ever experience anything like it again. I live very close to a hospital, had excellent care, and recovered fairly easily.
    Chronic conditions, like your dad has, are a different thing entirely, requiring a different approach. He’s lucky to have you.

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